EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing)

amanda-dalbjorn-258807-unsplash.jpg

EMDR is an acronym for ‘Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing’. It is a powerful psychological treatment method that was developed by an American clinical psychologist, Dr Francine Shapiro, in the 1980s. As a Senior Research Fellow at the Mental Research Institute, she published the first research data to support the benefits of the therapy in 1989.

EMDR is a complex and powerful therapy. All practitioners have a background in mental health before undertaking training in EMDR. 

Now recognised by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the World Health Organization as a treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

What is EMDR?

EMDR therapy involves the identification of unprocessed traumatic or other distressing experiences that are continuing to drive an individual’s psychological disturbance. Without going into details the client is asked to recall the worst aspect of the memory together with the accompanying currently held negative cognitions and associated bodily sensations. Simultaneously they are directed to move their eyes from side to side, or employ some other form of bilateral stimulation (BLS). The effect is to desensitise the client to the distressing memory but, more importantly, to reprocess the memory so that the associated cognitions become more adaptive.

EMDR can be useful for: 

  • Panic Attacks

  • Complicated Grief

  • Dissociative Disorders

  • Disturbing Memories

  •  Phobias, Pain Disorders

  • Performance Anxiety

  • Stress Reduction

  • Addictions

  •  Sexual and/or Physical Abuse

  • Body Dysmorphic Disorders

  • Personality Disorders

Practitioners